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  1. #1
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    Want better phones? Please read...

    The Problem...
    Sprint will only allow its customers to use phones that were purchased from Sprint. They will not allow customers to purchase third party devices. Even if the device is unlocked, and fully compatible with Sprint's network, they will not activate it unless it was purchased from Sprint.

    This is really hurting the development of new devices. There are manufacturers out there who simply refuse to make devices unless they are allowed to retail them. OEM's do not want to go through Sprint. Nokia and Motorolla are two OEM's that come to mind as companies who refused to deal with Sprint for a long time.

    Companies don't want waste lots of money developing a new device, only to have Sprint refuse to carry it. Companies also don't want to spend lots of money developing a new device, only to have Sprint "test" it for over a year- making the device obsolete by the time it's finally released.

    Sprint also refuses to deal with most OEM's. There are only a select few companies that Sprint will consider purchasing devices from. This makes it impossible for the small time sellers to do business with Sprint customers. As we are all well aware, there are some great deals out there by small time sellers- mostly online but some brick and morter as well. I personally would like to possibly send a spec sheet to a few OEMs and order several thousand devices to sell that do not exist yet. This is not possible with Sprint.

    This is not a problem with most carriers in the world. You can simply put your SIM card in whatever phone you want and it will work for you. This is not the case with Sprint. You have to call Sprint and get your phone activated by speaking to someone.

    The Solution...
    There is a technology available, and in use with some carriers since 2002, called RUIM. These are cards similar to SIM cards, but made for CDMA carriers like Sprint. Read more about them here:
    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-ruim-card.htm

    What can you do?
    Sprint has a message board that is monitored by company execs. you do NOT have to be a Sprint customer to post there. You do NOT need to give them any personal info to register. You do NOT need to give them your name, phone number, or anything else that you don't give any other message board to register. You can give them all fake info. They don't care. It's just like any other message board. Even if you're not a Sprint customer, let them know that you're not a customer because you like the freedom of popping a SIM card into a phone and using it. You do not like being limited in your phone choices. Register here:
    http://www.buzzaboutwireless.com/cms/compo.../task,register/
    And then post in these threads and let them know we want to use RUIM cards:
    http://forums.buzzaboutwireless.com/baw/bo...message.id=1034
    and
    http://forums.buzzaboutwireless.com/baw/bo...ding&page=1
    and
    http://forums.buzzaboutwireless.com/baw/bo...ding&page=1

    There may be other topics as well, but I wanted to make this easy for everyone.

    Spread the word.
    Put links to this post on all the message boards you visit. Put a link to it in your signature. We need to get the word out so people will let Sprint know how they feel. We don't know how long Sprint will be paying attention to those message boards, so we want to let them know right now, while we still can.

    Make it the Law
    You may or may not be aware that local land line telephone companies used to require their customers to buy phones from them. There was a law passed that requires them to allow third party phones purchased from third party sellers. In fact, I have heard that the law actually forbids the landline telephone companies from selling phones. I'm not sure about that, but I know I can go to Walmart (or just about any store) and buy a phone that works on my landline. It's only fair to require wireless carriers to also allow third party devices on their network. You should NOT have to buy a phone from Sprint (or from someone that bought it from Sprint) in order to use it on Sprint. As long as the device is compatible with Sprint's network, you should be able to use it. Please write your congress reps and let them know you want a law passed to open up the market. You can contact your House Rep here:
    http://www.house.gov/writerep/
    and your Senate Rep here:
    http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_info...enators_cfm.cfm
    Contact the FCC here:
    http://www.fcc.gov/contacts.html
    Please write to them and let them know that it would inspire competition in the market if they forced the wireless carriers to allow third party devices. A lot of carriers (mostly GSM) already allow third party devices. This is why there are so many advanced devices available for GSM networks. People always complain that the USA doesn't get the mopst advanced devices. Well you can get most of the advanced GSM devices in the USA, you just can't get CDMA devices for use on Sprint/Verizon/any other CDMA carrier. And if the law stated that these networs had to allow third party devices, there would be no shortage of companies trying to sell them to the public. Not only would you have the option to buy better devices, but you would have the option to start a business selling them as well. So please, let your congress reps know.

    Thank you for your time in reading this. I hope you will take the time to post on Sprint's message board. Please help us by spreading the word. Even if you have no intention of ever using Sprint, it would only help everyone for Sprint to allow 3rd party devices.
    Last edited by SaltyDawg; 03-28-2007 at 02:36 PM.

  2. #2
    boe
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    Nice freakin post

    Well organized!

    I know there are many many posts on Buzz's web site. I'd like to add just two more to that list of similar threads

    http://forums.buzzaboutwireless.com/...sage.id=26#M26

    http://forums.buzzaboutwireless.com/...y.id=1560#M521
    Want better phone selection from Sprint? http://www.smartphoneforums.com/foru...ease-read.html

  3. #3
    Registered User killabee44's Avatar
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    Excellent post. The only thing I am not sure about is if we might have to reach out to the FCC or Congress.

    Anyhow, hopefully peeps will make the effort to at least post with their support over at Buzzaboutwireless.com

  4. #4
    boe
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    I think someone is going to have to point back to this thread on a regular basis as just about anything outside the 6700 forum gets little viewing compared to the 6700 thread.
    Want better phone selection from Sprint? http://www.smartphoneforums.com/foru...ease-read.html

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by boe
    I think someone is going to have to point back to this thread on a regular basis as just about anything outside the 6700 forum gets little viewing compared to the 6700 thread.
    Very true. Thats why I am always unhappy when a thread I create get moved here.


    Great post. Very well organized.
    Palm IIIe > Palm IIIxe > Zire71 + Samsung a660 > PPC-6700 > Sprint PPC-6800 Mogul
    Help make your wireless company fair

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by boe
    I think someone is going to have to point back to this thread on a regular basis as just about anything outside the 6700 forum gets little viewing compared to the 6700 thread.
    You guys should put a link to it in your sigs...

  7. #7
    Mostly converged... Trident's Avatar
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    Sprint also uses the restricted sale of handsets to lock people in to their service.
    If they didn't have the ability to keep people on two year contracts by selling them devices that only they can sell, they would be forced to compete in the service-only market. Then, only the best provider would survive and thrive! You would see them offering better service at competetive rates (I think Sprint's rates are already pretty competetive) to keep customers instead of making them purchase discounted (often obsolete) hardware and forcing long term commitments.
    Peace ~ Trident
    Using my own custom WM6.5 ROMGO GATORS! NCAA National Champs x3~ Football & Basketball(x2)!

  8. #8
    Got the Mogul finally!!
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    I just wrote my the House of Representative person about this issue. Thank you to HobbesIsReal for your signature. The bright red got me to read it and do something about it. I'll see if I can add something to my signature as well.

  9. #9
    Got the Mogul finally!!
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    As you can see I have added a link to this thread in my signature as well. That is how I found the thread so hopefully having it in my thread will help others to find it as well.

  10. #10
    boe
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    One more proposal in the right direction
    Columbia Professor: "Open Up That Spectrum, Mr. FCC" - Gizmodo
    Want better phone selection from Sprint? http://www.smartphoneforums.com/foru...ease-read.html

  11. #11
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    Here's an WSJ article about the topic that's real recent. The link will work for a short while A Fight Over What You Can Do on a Cellphone - WSJ.com
    Blario

  12. #12
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    AIR WAR
    A Fight Over What You
    Can Do on a Cellphone
    Handset Makers Push
    Free Features for Which
    Carriers Want to Charge
    By JESSICA E. VASCELLARO
    June 14, 2007; Page A1

    Wireless phone carriers and the makers of hand-held gadgets like the BlackBerry have long had a symbiotic relationship. Carriers sell the BlackBerry to subscribers, putting it in the hands of millions. In turn, the carriers get to charge their subscribers not just for voice but for pricier data service as well.

    Now, a turf war is looming between the two camps, as lucrative new services such as video, games, and maps move onto mobile devices. Each camp wants to control the new offerings, and the gusher of revenue they could produce.

    The war is already playing out over the popular BlackBerry. Its maker Research In Motion Ltd. wants to move beyond its core business market, so it designed a device with features like video and music players. RIM wanted to include an electronic map, too, to let users find directions. But it needed AT&T Inc., which sells BlackBerrys to consumers and provides wireless service, to agree that the new model launched earlier this year could include this mapping software.

    AT&T said no. It wanted to offer its subscribers its own version of a map service, and charge them $9.99 a month.

    "There's a battle for customer ownership," says Jim Balsillie, co-chief executive of RIM. "There is going to be a considerable reordering of the...food chain."

    At stake for consumers are what services will be available on their mobile phones and whether they're free or cost a monthly fee. The wireless Web is taking off more slowly in America than overseas, and one reason is that U.S. carriers tightly control what applications are available on mobile devices. That's a contrast with Europe and parts of Asia, where carriers' control is less tight and where wireless services have been more broadly available for years.

    Pressure is building for U.S. carriers to loosen their grip. The push comes in part from handset makers that want to make their devices more attractive by including a host of services and software applications. If the handset makers succeed, consumers could see a rise in the number of sophisticated applications available free.

    For investors, at issue is who gets what share of the $15 billion-plus of revenue generated annually by mobile data services in the U.S. -- a market that is forecast to explode. Phone carriers want the revenue to offset declining revenue from their voice businesses.

    Until recently, carriers and cellphone manufacturers didn't have much to fight over. The phones had few fancy features besides text messaging and cameras. But they're morphing into little computers, able to do such things as download music, stream video and surf the Web. Handset makers now include computer companies such as Hewlett-Packard Co. and Apple Inc.

    The reason the carriers are in such a powerful position is that in the U.S., handset makers typically don't have direct relationships with consumers. Instead, carriers buy handsets in bulk from the likes of RIM, Nokia Corp. and Motorola Inc., reselling them to people who buy service plans. If carriers don't like a feature a handset maker has built in, they can simply refuse to buy it.

    Manufacturers can sometimes overcome such resistance by having a product so sought-after that carriers don't want to say no. An example is the iPhone, due out from Apple later this month. Apple leveraged the huge popularity of its iPod music player to get AT&T to sell consumers the iPhone without also offering -- as AT&T had wanted to do -- the carrier's own line of games and ring tones.

    The BlackBerry's great popularity has also sometimes let its maker flex its muscles. With nearly half the U.S. market for smart phones -- those that include features such as email and a Web browser -- RIM has been largely responsible for getting consumers to upgrade their cellphone service plans to data plans. These are more lucrative for carriers. Using this leverage, RIM has persuaded carriers to include some free features, such as instant-messaging, in BlackBerry models.

    Handset makers also sometimes try to bypass the carriers' control by selling directly to consumers. But carriers' resistance to efforts to go around them can be fierce, for historical reasons. As the Web goes wireless, they want to prevent a repeat of what happened when the Internet first arose. They provided access to it, but the businesses that thrived were others, such as Amazon.com, that provided services over the Net. Carriers were reduced to what the industry calls "dumb pipes." To avoid that plight, wireless companies tightly control what services cellphone consumers can access, their cost and who displays what on cellphone screens.

    The BlackBerry has long been a big money maker for the carriers. They first began buying the email devices in bulk and selling them to consumers in 2000, along with the data service plans for their use. There are about eight million BlackBerry subscribers world-wide now.

    Competition soon arose. Palm Inc. and Nokia also began making handsets with email as well as voice capability. On the software side, Microsoft Corp. offered an operating system to compete with the one RIM had built for the BlackBerry.

    Mike Lazaridis, who had founded RIM in 1984 while a student in Ontario, decided BlackBerry needed a makeover to keep up its fast growth. Aiming to attract ordinary cellphone users, not just business customers, he set out a few years ago to turn it into a hip consumer device.

    First, he asked engineers to make it smaller. They trimmed its battery size by 20% and developed a smaller keyboard. They gave it software that recognizes the words users are trying to type.

    For navigating, the team added a trackball -- in effect a tiny, upside-down computer mouse. Mr. Lazaridis baptized this model the Pearl because that's what the translucent trackball vaguely resembled.

    He asked RIM employees, who included hundreds of college students, to develop new applications. Within months, they designed music players, photo software, and instant-messaging software to send short text messages quickly.

    Mr. Lazaridis encouraged outside software designers, too. A software company called Magmic Inc. developed Bplay, a Web site with ring tones and games that owners of the BlackBerry Pearl could download for a few dollars each.

    Another company, Handmark Inc., developed software to let users get weather, sports and news alerts. And one called 30 Second Software produced software so users could send flowers, chocolates or books to a person on a user's contact list with a few clicks.

    RIM wanted to have these types of services available on the Pearl when consumers bought it. The alternative was for users to find and download the software from Web sites, via the device's Internet browser. That system would greatly reduce the services' appeal. Many people wouldn't realize the services existed or would find downloading them too hard.

    Carriers refused to include these features in the menu of icons users can click on. For example, RIM executives enjoyed using their own BlackBerrys to play games like Texas Hold 'em, which can be downloaded from the Bplay Web site that Magmic built. They talked to AT&T about including the Bplay games in the BlackBerry Pearl. Instead of agreeing to this, AT&T made some Bplay games available from its own virtual store, Media Mall.

    Now users of the BlackBerry Pearl must pay a few dollars to download a game. The money is split between Magmic and AT&T. "The carriers want their own content store," says a Magmic vice president, Nicholas Reichenbach.

    RIM also wanted to offer BlackBerry users a free search service for finding things like movie theaters, show times and restaurants. It spent months developing such a feature with InfoSpace Inc., according to an executive of that software company. The two companies talked about possibly splitting revenue from ads sold against the locater service among RIM, InfoSpace and a wireless phone carrier.

    Again, carriers balked. Sprint Nextel Corp. felt such an ad-supported service would compete with its own local navigation service -- for which Sprint charges -- according to someone familiar with the matter. The result is that InfoSpace now is trying to get BlackBerry owners to use their Web browser to download the locater service from InfoSpace's Web site. Sprint Nextel declined to comment.

    RIM's Mr. Balsillie says his company's role is to create phones that carriers want to sell, but the arguments over which features make it onto the devices can be frustrating.

    RIM has scored some victories. AT&T, seeing the popularity of the BlackBerry Messenger instant-messaging service, agreed to let RIM make this a standard feature on the Pearl model. Before, AT&T customers with BlackBerrys could get the instant-messaging service only by downloading it from RIM's Web site.

    Even without some of the features RIM wanted built in, the Pearl was a big success when it came out last September. Wireless carriers have sold nearly a million, analysts estimate, including overseas.

    Other handset makers face similar issues. The carrier Verizon Wireless declined to offer its subscribers Apple's forthcoming iPhone, according to people familiar with the matter. Verizon wanted it to include Verizon's own music and video service along with Apple's, an arrangement unacceptable to Apple. The joint owners of Verizon Wireless, Verizon Communications Inc. and Vodafone Group PLC, have been heavily marketing their music and video service for monthly fees. AT&T, by contrast, agreed to offer the iPhone without putting in its own mobile Web and entertainment service.

    Earlier this year Nokia and Motorola announced their own navigation and mapping services, using Global Positioning System technology to send directions, maps and local search information to cellphones. They're trying to go straight to consumers. Motorola plans to sell a tiny GPS receiver that lets consumers access maps and directions when it's placed near its newest phones. It will be available through wireless operators and on Motorola's Web site.

    Nokia has begun selling a separate smart phone with navigation software through its U.S. Nokia stores, at other retailers and online. The Finnish company is one of the few handset makers that deal with U.S. consumers directly through their own stores. Consumers who buy a mobile device at retail must activate it by swapping in a service card from another phone they've bought. While the vast majority of phones in the U.S. are sold through wireless carriers, overseas many consumers buy phones and wireless service separately.

    Seeking to get ahead of the pack, Motorola, Hewlett-Packard and Nokia want to build more handsets with WiFi technology. With this, a cellphone user could tap the Internet at any café, airport or home that has a WiFi "hot spot." Besides using it for smart phones' built-in Internet browsers, consumers could use the connection to make Internet phone calls.

    That would be a threat to wireless carriers. Subscribers would be bypassing the carriers' networks for calls. Carriers have so far largely refused to sell WiFi phones for mainstream cellphone and smart-phone users. To date, carriers have agreed to sell only a few handset models with WiFi, to enterprises whose employees often work at locations like hospitals.

    When Nokia wanted to bring a new wireless email device to the U.S. last year, AT&T insisted it remove the WiFi chip before AT&T would offer it to consumers. A Nokia sales executive, Todd Thayer, said the company will be less likely to strike that compromise in the future and will sell WiFi handsets directly in its stores. A spokeswoman for AT&T said the carrier will permit only those built-in features it thinks subscribers want.

    WiFi technology could let owners of cellphones download songs and videos more rapidly, and use the devices in areas with weak cellular reception. For those reasons, RIM also wants to build WiFi technology into BlackBerry models, says RIM's co-CEO, Mr. Balsillie. RIM plans to launch a device with WiFi by the end of the year.

    The Waterloo, Ontario, company isn't slowing its push into advanced services despite carriers' resistance. In March, it gave software companies access to the code underlying more applications for advanced BlackBerrys, to make it easier for them to build services tailored to the devices.

    A company called QuickPlay Media Inc. plans to launch a service this summer that would allow users to download video content like music videos and sports highlights to BlackBerrys. QuickPlay saved months of development time by using the device's existing video player rather than creating its own. Having access to the software code also enabled QuickPlay, of Toronto, to create features such as being able to easily store and locate videos on the device.

    Write to Jessica E. Vascellaro at jessica.vascellaro@wsj.com
    Blario

  13. #13
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    I cant believe that people believe that it is a bad idea to force carriers to activate third party devices. They dont realize how these stupid corporations are limiting our choices!
    Palm IIIe > Palm IIIxe > Zire71 + Samsung a660 > PPC-6700 > Sprint PPC-6800 Mogul
    Help make your wireless company fair

  14. #14
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    I have made Verizon and Sprint PPC6700 based Phone to RUIM Based
    1. You just have to Open the Mother boad and Solder the RUIM Slot into it.
    2. then after Rebooting it, You have to type ##diag into Phone and then Click to Start and then Connecte to Mini USB of Computer
    3. then using QPST in Service Programming go to tab 1x HDR the in RUIM Box
    4. Select RUIM only or RUIM if Avail then again Reboot the PPC and Push the RUIM Card into the Phone
    5. Your Phone is RUIM Based now

    Any More Query please mail me on

    i am from India Using Verizon Phone RUIM Base in Reliance Network

    Reliance Freely gives RUIM card in India

    hetaldp@gmail.com
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-001.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-002.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-003.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-004.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-005.jpg  

    Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-006.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-007.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-008.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-009.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-010.jpg  

    Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-011.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-012.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-013.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-014.jpg   Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-tray-01.jpg  

    Want better phones? Please read...-ruim-tray-02.jpg  
    Last edited by Hetal Patel; 06-23-2007 at 10:03 AM.

  15. #15
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    A while ago I saw this item on ebay:
    eBay: Audiovox xv6700 PDA CDMA Ruim, NEW Accesories Indonesia (item 250119857484 end time Jun-04-07 06:52:55 PDT)
    of course, it immediately caught my eye. I messaged the seller to ask if it was really RUIM, since it said verizon. The seller simply said: "its a used Verizon phone, now no more. you cannot activated the phone on verizon. I am sure you cannot use the phone in US. thanks for your questions". By any chance, was that you?

    This is very good proof that CDMA phones are interchangeable between carriers. If only there was enough motivation for legal action. But either people dont even know about this issue, or they roll over and convince themselves that these wireless giants are doing nothing unfair. Great work. How did you figure this out? Would it work on any apache?
    Palm IIIe > Palm IIIxe > Zire71 + Samsung a660 > PPC-6700 > Sprint PPC-6800 Mogul
    Help make your wireless company fair

  16. #16
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    We can convert major phone to RUIM based if they matched the following COnditions

    1. Then have 6 Pin Layout on board where we can solder RUIM Tray
    2. Phone Should have Sufficient Margin for Slot and RUIM to be plugged in.
    3. PPC6700 is already there in China with RUIM as Only Option
    4. In India so many Person get PPC6700 from USA and COnvert them into RUIM by above Trick and use it on 2 CDMA Network Reliance or Tata in India.

  17. #17
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    If Phone can be Put in 3 Modes

    0. RUIM Mode
    1. NVM MOde (Original Non Volatile MOde)
    2 RUIM if available (means if RUIM Inserted then on RUIM or else using NVM Data)

    I using in India with 3 Mode means in India use RUIM Card and while in USA Just Remove the RUIM Card and it will work as your Original Phone.

  18. #18
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    Excellent information!

    Thanks you for the posts! I had no idea the 6700 could actually use a RUIM card...

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    Question on this?

    I am considering getting one of the HTC phones (HTC Touch or HTC P3600) -- but I am with AT&T/Cingular who does not carry either phone.

    How would I be able to use one of these phones while still staying with AT&T? I have a PDAPhone (Siemens SX66), and I still have my SIM card. However, I don't know how it would work in one of these new phones.

    Can someone please advise? Thanks!

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    Can we sticky this?

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