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  1. #1
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    p-Outlook can I combine desktop inbox with ppc inbox?

    I kinda find it annoying to have two seperate inboxes to look through on the PPC.

    One under the "POP3" (default account name in wizard)
    And one under Outlook E-Mail.

    I tried to name "POP3" in wizard to Outlook E-Mail but it would not let me because it is already used.

    Now if I deleted both POP3 and Outlook E-Mail and then reran wizard with "Outlook E-Mail" account name would it merge?

    Would it get confuse?

  2. #2
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    mswlogo,

    did ever get any resolution to this problem? I have run into the same problem. I do pop3 email to both my laptop and xv6600, and would like them to sync to each other. Instead, the laptop outlook syncs to "Outlook E-Mail" but I can only grab emails over EVDO with the pop3 email. I've tried to add pop3 to the "Outlook Email" but it doesn't let me do that, and I've also tried renaming the pop3 and it won't let me do that either. What was your solution?

  3. #3
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    What I do is use Outlook to D/L my POP mail every 5 minutes and dump it into the Outlook Inbox, then just Sync the PPC to the Outlook Inbox (no POP account set up on the PPC). Then, whenever I do a wireless sync back to Outlook, I get the Outlook and POP mail, and when I send from the PPC, I get copies in my Outlook Sent Mail Folder.
    -Lee
    Samsung i730
    Ridata 1GB SD Card, Transcend 4GB SD card, PPC Tech Audio Adapter

  4. #4
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    kada, I have not resolved it yet, but have not tried that hard.

    lmychajluk, I see what your doing, thanks for the suggestion, it may work for some. But seems a round about way to do something you would think is simple. Expensive in the sense that now I have to dedicate and run a laptop at home to pop my mail and wireless sync too. I can't pop my (personel) email over the work network which is part of the reason I got the pda phone.

  5. #5
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    I'm using wireless sync to poll both my Exchange email at work and my RoadRunner Pop email at home. Both are deposited in a single Outlook folder on my 6600.

    I was told by a Verizon tech that wireless sync isn't suppose to work with two email sources, but it seems to work just fine. The only problem that I've had with wireless sync is that it doesn't like the exchange cache mode set in Outlook.

  6. #6
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    Guys, you're basically asking for an Exchange server.

    I ended up biting the bullet and signing up for MailStreet.com. Now that I'm on the other side, I'll never go back.

    Con: $10+2 per month (more on this later)
    Pro: Everything mail, calender and contacts are now syncing with an exchange server. I have 1) my office PC 2) my home pc 3) my laptop 3) my test development machine and 4) my XV6600 all now pointing to the server. Make a change on one, and within seconds the change is reflected on each other one. Delete from my XV, and it deletes from all. Read a new message from my laptop, my XV shows the message as read. Add a contact, make an appointment ect... I think you get the idea.

    The fees seemed steep to me the first month after the first free month. But once I realized that 2 less large mocha javas at Starbucks per month paid for this convenience, I laughed pretty hard. Its a small price to pay for this kind of integration.

    FYI, I ended up creating my own domain name thru MailStreet and having them host the mail service for it (same $10 fee per month, no additional charge; this way I can slowly phase out all my other pop accounts). The other option would have been to use one of their subdomians created specifically for you. In either case you'll set up your pop accounts to all forward to the new MailStreet account. Then, with Outlook, you would configure a new email account for each address you'd like to send from. So, in other words, you'll have X number of accounts forwarding to your MailStreet account, and X outlook clients reading from the server. Then, on each Outlook client, you can select who to send from and either actually use the outgoing SMTP service your used to using, or just use the MailStreet with a Reply to address configured appropriately.

    I have now converted no less than 10 people over to this. Damn I should be working for MailStreet... but at the end of the day, with Exchange working exactly as advertised, without me having to invest huge sums in servers, software hosting... the $12 a month is a bargain.

    If you have any specific questions please do not hesitate to ask. I'd love to help, if I can...

    Edit: I should add there is also an online Outlook client available too (included in the monthly fee). So just point any IE 5.x + compatible browser to MailStreet.com, sign in and access your information exactly as though you were at one of your Outlook clients, with one limitation: the online version does not support multiple From accounts. So if you were to send from the online version, it will always come from the MailStreet address. The way around this is to compose the email out there in the world somewhere, and save it as a draft. Now when you get back to your office or home (or finally recharge your XV ) open any of your Outlook clients and that draft will show up. Open it, specify which account you want to send from and away it goes.
    Last edited by JasonWilliam; 01-17-2005 at 06:58 PM.

  7. #7
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    Heheh... I got a new PDA phone for the same reason. In my situation, though, I guess I'm my own IS guy, and run my own Exchange server, and I have a couple of PC's at home always running, so it's no biggie to leave Outlook running on one.

    I can see how different situations require different solutions. I sync my PPC to my own Exchange Server and POP account so I have access to my own personal email from (relatively) short term client assignments. I've been on full-time contract with my current client for the past 3 months, and just started a new project for the next 3. By policy, I'm not allowed to check personal email, though I can technically access my Outlook Website, but to stay compliant, I got a vx6600. I don't care about my internal email at the client - if they want me to be available after-hours via email, let them make the arrangements to get it to me (via a POP/IMAP server I can get to from outside the building) - otherwise, it can wait until the next business day.

    Upon doing a little research (OK, reading the WebIS manual), it seems that POP and IMAP have to be kept seperate, which may actually be a limitation/feature of the protocols. However, if you did manage to get your PPC to dump all the mail in one Folder, wouldn't that put your POP mail in Outlook, which is what your IS guys are trying to prevent in the first place?
    -Lee
    Samsung i730
    Ridata 1GB SD Card, Transcend 4GB SD card, PPC Tech Audio Adapter

  8. #8
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    Jason,

    thanks for the input. that may be very well what I should be doing in my case. I have a home office desktop, a laptop and the xv6600, so the best scenario would be to have all 3 always sync'd to each other. I think I'll look into this, it may be worth the money, especially since it is for my business (it'll be a tax deduction...)

  9. #9
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    Kada, for business there is also the added benefit of Public Folder support. So, if you were to have a couple users all signed up and working with MailStreet, you can configure your public folders to work together. This gives you the ability to share a public calander, contacts, inbox... even some file space. I've found this to be of limited usefullness to this point, since I'm only a one man show... but in a multi user enviornment where coordination is paramount this might be a wonderful thing.

  10. #10
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    Jason,

    Just as an FYI, being able to send from multiple accounts is a function of Outlook (the Desktop version), not the Exchange server, which is why you can't do it through Outlook Web Access, which is more a part of Exchange. If you have Outlook 2003, this is even easier, as there is an 'Account' dropdown next to the 'Send' button when composing a new email. When you select an account other than the Exchange account, it goes out directly, not through the Exchange Server.
    -Lee
    Samsung i730
    Ridata 1GB SD Card, Transcend 4GB SD card, PPC Tech Audio Adapter

  11. #11
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    I'm a one man show as well - president, engineer, accounting, slave driver, slave drivee, secretary, human resources, janitor, and deadweight...

  12. #12
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    Can it do secure (SSL) IMAP with specific ports? I can't seem to find that out on the mailstreet website, and I can't get into "Support" without an account.

  13. #13
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    All that means is that when things are slow, you can lay yourself off and collect unemployment!
    -Lee
    Samsung i730
    Ridata 1GB SD Card, Transcend 4GB SD card, PPC Tech Audio Adapter

  14. #14
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    Thanks Imy... thats what I was trying to get across. Hope that helps avoid any confusion someone might have had.

    Just as a comparison, can you throw out some ballpark dollar numbers for someone like me setting up similar exchange functionality as MailStreet? Starting from scratch, how much would it cost me to go the full nine yards and replicate MailStreet so I don't have to pay them. Not that I'm going to of course... but I wonder how long at $12 a month I can go before the cost of a self supported server would have been cheaper.

  15. #15
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    Lee,

    I do always have my home office desktop PC on, is it hard to set up an exchange server on it? Unfortunately, I am also my own IT guy, except I don't really know what I'm doing... I'm really just a chip design guy but somehow struggle my way thru getting my PCs and network going.

  16. #16
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    Originally posted by lmychajluk
    All that means is that when things are slow, you can lay yourself off and collect unemployment!
    Hey, you are just a wealth of great ideas.....
    but if I lay myself off, I'll need to hire a real IT guy who knows what they're doing, don't think I can afford that on unemployment!

  17. #17
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    Originally posted by kada
    Hey, you are just a wealth of great ideas.....
    but if I lay myself off, I'll need to hire a real IT guy who knows what they're doing, don't think I can afford that on unemployment!
    Or you could do what I do: give yourself a raise, then lay yourself off in efforts to cut costs. Then, when nothing gets done, hire yourself back for even more money, apologizing profusely to yourself because you didn't realize just how valuable you really were to the company.

    Now you don't feel so bad for not knowing IT stuff, and you don't care since your just so happy you took your job back after being so badly treated!

  18. #18
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    Originally posted by Dmotto
    Can it do secure (SSL) IMAP with specific ports? I can't seem to find that out on the mailstreet website, and I can't get into "Support" without an account.
    Dmotto, I hopped online with one of their tech support people. It seems the answer is No. Here is a copy of our conversation:

    ** You are now speaking with Rafael, MailStreet. **
    Rafael : hi Jason.
    Jason : Hi Rafael
    Rafael : I will be glad to assist you.
    Jason : thanks!
    Jason : Can you do secure (SSL) IMAP with specific ports?
    Rafael : may I have your domain name please?
    Jason : Sure, xxxxxxx.com
    Rafael : one moment please
    Rafael : unfortunately, we do not support other than the default setting.
    Jason : Ok, so no support for customer configurable ports then?
    Rafael : Correct.
    ect...

  19. #19
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    Exchange Server won't run on XP. It needs Windows Server 2003. Though you can set it up for IMAP access, Outlook and PocketPC don't need it. Exchange Active Sync works over HTTP/HTTPS, so it can be encrypted with an SSL certificate (I issued my own, but a purchased certificate will also work).

    Okay, here's the cheap (and legal) way out for setting up an Exchange Server:

    What you need:

    Dell Server - 420SC - 2.8Ghz, 512MB RAM - ~$350 Base
    Microsoft Small Business Server - $500 (5-User License)
    Hard Drive Capacity / Raid (Redundancy) as per your needs
    Backup - as per your needs (I use an extra HD in an external firewire enclosure)
    Total, probably between $1000-1500 one time investment

    ISP charges - as per your needs. I use Comcast Cable (standard) for connectiveity - $40/mo
    Domain Name - $15/YR
    CustomDNS Services (via DynDNS.org) - $25/YR
    - Provides link between my domain name and Comcast's IP address
    MailHop Outbound (via DynDNS.org) - $15/YR
    - Provides an outbound SMTP server
    SpamStopshere - $125/YR
    - spam and virus filtering, plus MX Backup in case your server/link is down

    MS Small Business Server includes Windows Server 2003, IIS Web Server, Exchange Server, Remote Access Server, Media Server (stream your own feeds!), and Outlook Licenses. (Premium Edition also adds ISA Firewall Server and SQL Server).
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/sbs/howtobuy/pricing.mspx#EPAA

    How to set it up:
    If your somewhat computer/internet literate, it's actually pretty easy. Get the server connected to your Broadband router, then install configure SBS as per the on-screen wizards. The MS SBS edition is meant for small business owners that may not be able to afford FT IT support, so there's Wizards for setting up just about everything. Just follow the on-screen instructions for most of it. You may want to review some of the articles here to see if you're getting in over your head:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/sbs/techinfo/planning/default.mspx

    One thing so far - as far as the DynamicDNS goes, I use a Broadband Router with a built-in DynamicDNS Client (Linksys WRT54G). If you don't have a Router with the client, it may require a little more configuration, as you may need to install a software client on the server.

    Set up your hostname in your DynDNS client, and MX records to point to the SpamStopsHere servers via DynDNS's website. Then forward the mail from SpamStopsHere's MX servers to your Hostname via thier web config tool.

    Configure another client on your network with Outlook to connect to the Exchange Server and any POP accounts you may want to grab, and set it to check every few minutes.
    Edit - You won't need this if you just forward all your POP accounts to your domain email.

    Once this is all done, in theory, you should be able to install Activesync on the PC running Outlook and have it set up the PPC to connect to the Exchange server.

    I've been a little short on details, but that's because everyone may end up being a little different anyway, and there's plenty of resources out there with details on each individual step in the process. This may sound like a lot of money, but the initial investment is a one-time deal that will probably last you 3-5 years if you don't skimp. The annual fees are <$200, not counting your ISP that you would most likely have anyway, so I think that' s comparable to a hosted solution, but you'll also have much more flexibility, especially now that you have your own web and streaming media server! Think of all the fun you can have!
    Last edited by lmychajluk; 01-17-2005 at 08:16 PM.
    -Lee
    Samsung i730
    Ridata 1GB SD Card, Transcend 4GB SD card, PPC Tech Audio Adapter

  20. #20
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    What a #(%*(%*#. P-Outlook supports SSL but not specific ports. Every other damn mail client does not support secure IMAP which most businesses employ. WebIS Mail might be it. My company has VPN I can use, but support is going away in favor of a Cisco=based system, which means support for independant systems like the PPC is out.

    Come on Microsoft, business people are depending on you. Think.

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