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  1. #1
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    Is it really only 802.11b and not "g"?

    The specs on phonescoop.com state the WiFi on the 730 is 802.11b. I'm surprised they wouldn't use 802.11g. I don't care much about the speed, but the range on "b" is horrible compared to "g"

    Rich

  2. #2
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    I have not read anything to indicate that 802.11g would be included in the device so I would say 802.11b it is. Sorry...

  3. #3
    NeedSupport NeedVideo's Avatar
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    Re: Is it really only 802.11b and not "g"?

    Originally posted by richlux
    The specs on phonescoop.com state the WiFi on the 730 is 802.11b. I'm surprised they wouldn't use 802.11g. I don't care much about the speed, but the range on "b" is horrible compared to "g"

    Rich
    I thought the range was the same?

  4. #4
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    Range is about the same DL speeds are the only major difference. 11mb for B 54mb for G. I think g uses more power too

  5. #5
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    DL speed will be limited to your ISP, which will be much less (usually) than the 11Mbps network speed at which B runs

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by johnyphonehome
    Range is about the same DL speeds are the only major difference. 11mb for B 54mb for G. I think g uses more power too
    I know DL speeds are 11 mbps versus 54, but I'm pretty sure that the range of G is greater than the range of B. I can't find them right now, but there are a number of articles on the Web discussing the increased range of "G". My Netgear G card shows a nice chart on the box how the "G" gives it 2 to 3 times the range....

    Rich

  7. #7
    Techguru alanb's Avatar
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    My "G" router certainly has better range then my old "B" router, even when communicating with "B" cards.

    With "B" I needed a second access point just to get full coverage in the house. Now with the "G" router, I can still get a good signal with my "G" card at the very far edge of the yard, and with a "B" card, almost as far.

    Alan

  8. #8
    Registered User jpmihalk's Avatar
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    The range differences may simply be the result of more power applied. The frequencies used for B/G are the same and therefore the wavelength and penetration are the same, if the radiated power is equal.
    John

  9. #9
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    well said John, yes there is no difference. Your old B router is exactly that, old, and probally didn't output at the same power as new G radios. Most radios (wireless radios) output at the same power. G on a pocket pc is a waste anyway. You cant fill the RAM/ROM/SD card at 11 megs anyway, let alone 54
    Thanks
    - Andrew - PDAPhoneHome.com

  10. #10
    Techguru alanb's Avatar
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    Originally posted by jpmihalk
    The range differences may simply be the result of more power applied. The frequencies used for B/G are the same and therefore the wavelength and penetration are the same, if the radiated power is equal.
    You are most probably correct. I'll need to dig out the spec sheet to see what the power output is on the radio.

    Alan

  11. #11
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    If its a linksys you can see power outputs in the firmware usally.
    Thanks
    - Andrew - PDAPhoneHome.com

  12. #12
    Techguru alanb's Avatar
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    Originally posted by tange1
    If its a linksys you can see power outputs in the firmware usally.
    They are both Dlinks.

    alan

  13. #13
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    Dlink may have this option also, as a NetAdmin i never suggust dilink products, even for home use. Not when Linksys is a option for a cost that is very close.
    Thanks
    - Andrew - PDAPhoneHome.com

  14. #14
    Registered User jpmihalk's Avatar
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    I'm speaking theoretically, of course. I have had the pleasure of installing over 800 802.11A/B/G AP's throughout our company's many campuses and did most of the wireless maps for coverage. B/G coverage is the same (using the same AP's) but A coverage requires 4 AP's for the same coverage as 1 B/G AP due to the higher frequencies transmitted on. At work we use Cisco AP's. At home, I use NetGear.

    Different manufacturers have different AP's with different power outputs, etc. As they say, your mileage may vary.
    John

  15. #15
    Registered User zucchero's Avatar
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    Re: Re: Is it really only 802.11b and not "g"?

    Originally posted by NeedVideo
    I thought the range was the same?
    Not quite.

    All things being equal, the premise behind b and g is this:

    "g" has more bandwidth and less range
    "b" has more range and less bandwidth

    If "g" had both more bandwidth and range, "b" would have died years ago.

    John

  16. #16
    Registered User Iceman's Avatar
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    Now wait a minute. "b" came out first, and everyone standardized on it. Now that "g" is out, "b" will start fading away because of the lack of bandwidth. It has nothing to do with range. I didn't get a "g" access point until my "b" access point died.

  17. #17
    Registered User jpmihalk's Avatar
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    Re: Re: Re: Is it really only 802.11b and not "g"?

    Originally posted by zucchero
    Not quite.

    All things being equal, the premise behind b and g is this:

    "g" has more bandwidth and less range
    "b" has more range and less bandwidth

    If "g" had both more bandwidth and range, "b" would have died years ago.

    John
    Not quite true. B and G use the same carrier frequencies (2.4 GHz) but use different encoding mechanisms to carry the data. G is able to compress the data more efficiently and that's why there is "more bandwidth" and it's also why G equipment is backwards compatible with B. All things being equal, the only differences are that G carries more data, and G generally costs more (for a home user, G is overkill... your internet connection is only less than 1MB, but a corporate WLAN is something else.)
    John

  18. #18
    Techguru alanb's Avatar
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    Re: Re: Re: Re: Is it really only 802.11b and not "g"?

    Originally posted by jpmihalk
    Not quite true. B and G use the same carrier frequencies (2.4 GHz) but use different encoding mechanisms to carry the data. G is able to compress the data more efficiently and that's why there is "more bandwidth" and it's also why G equipment is backwards compatible with B. All things being equal, the only differences are that G carries more data, and G generally costs more (for a home user, G is overkill... your internet connection is only less than 1MB, but a corporate WLAN is something else.)
    I disagree about "G" being overkill in the home. I have a number of different computers that share data, including real-time streming of full quality TV from a server to my laptop. It only works well on "G".

    In general, you are correct that "B" is good enough for internet connections, although cable modems can be up to 7 Meg, not less then 1 meg. However, Verizon is now rolling out FIOS service (Fiber Optic Internet Service) running fiber to the home, and it offers 15 meg downstream (2 meg upstream, $45/month. yowza!). I just got installed two weeks ago, and you need "G" to fully take advantage of it. They gave me a good discounted price on the "G" router, and a free "G" card for one of my computers that only had a "B" card.

    alan

  19. #19
    Registered User Iceman's Avatar
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    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Is it really only 802.11b and not "g"?

    Originally posted by alanb
    ... Verizon is now rolling out FIOS service (Fiber Optic Internet Service) running fiber to the home, and it offers 15 meg downstream (2 meg upstream, $45/month. yowza!). I just got installed two weeks ago, and you need "G" to fully take advantage of it.
    OMG! 15 MB down?? Dayum, I am finally going to have to get off my butt and check out what's happening in Minny.

  20. #20
    Registered User jpmihalk's Avatar
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    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Is it really only 802.11b and not "g"?

    Originally posted by alanb
    I disagree about "G" being overkill in the home. I have a number of different computers that share data, including real-time streming of full quality TV from a server to my laptop. It only works well on "G".

    In general, you are correct that "B" is good enough for internet connections, although cable modems can be up to 7 Meg, not less then 1 meg. However, Verizon is now rolling out FIOS service (Fiber Optic Internet Service) running fiber to the home, and it offers 15 meg downstream (2 meg upstream, $45/month. yowza!). I just got installed two weeks ago, and you need "G" to fully take advantage of it. They gave me a good discounted price on the "G" router, and a free "G" card for one of my computers that only had a "B" card.

    alan
    OK, well you are not the average user at home.

    For the not-so-technical, B is plenty. For those with full NT domains or AD forests at home, yeah... G is better.
    John

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