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  1. #1
    Editor and Site Administrator Convergent's Avatar
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    Hurricane Katrina

    Anyone effected by Hurricane Katrina? This thing just keeps getting worse and worse the more the reports come out. I also can't believe the political exploits that are going on with this. About the only impact up here so far is the quickly inflating gas prices... that will quickly inflate other things as well since shipping costs are directly connected to fuel prices.
    Mike - Been Converged?

  2. #2
    Fisher of Men mwfielder's Avatar
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    I hardly even want to watch the news....

    Only thing we have in the DFW area is higher gas prices. 2.99 for premium earlier today. I saw on the local news that all our Red Cross shelters were full of "refugees" from La. I did have a pregnant patient come to my practice, displaced from La. and staying with relatives. She has no idea when/if she will go back.

    Such devastation there---how can you possibly recover?
    Jeremiah 29:11

  3. #3
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    i work in the newsroom at CNN so i see everything that comes in.. we have gas here in atlanta thats 5.89.. and thats just regular gas.. time warner , who owns cnn, just donated 250,000 dollars to the cause...

  4. #4
    Editor and Site Administrator Convergent's Avatar
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    Wow... and I thought the $3.29 here was high!

    I was kind of tuned out for the last few days and it just hit me how big this was today when I heard them talk about 20,000 refugees being moved to Texas because they had no place for them in Lousiana. I have never hear that kind of thing in the US, and the language really hit me. Then I did a little reading on FoxNews (sorry Marc.... ) and they have a page with the worst hurricane disasters in the last couple a hundred years. This could end up being the top of the list. Only two on the list were category 5 storms which this started as.
    Mike - Been Converged?

  5. #5
    PPC6600 ROM=1.36.00 Ext=1.36.113 MannieBothans's Avatar
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    CASH DONATIONS ARE THE BEST WAY TO HELP HURRICANE RELIEF AT THIS TIME

    Here's some news from my neck of the woods. FWIW, I've personally vetted these groups and they are all legit and worthy causes:

    Donations to Church groups will help get needed supplies to those impacted by Katrina.

    Even before Hurricane Katrina hit the Florida and Gulf Coasts, Kentuckians have kept phone lines busy asking how to get involved and volunteer for the relief effort. Because of this outpouring of support, the Kentucky Office of Homeland Security and the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management remind potential volunteers to contact their local emergency management agencies to get involved. The best form of assistance at this time comes in the form of cash.

    The Kentucky Interchurch Disaster Recovery Program recommends that members of the Kentucky Council of Churches Donate through Church World Service http://www.cwserp.org/ or one of the faith groups listed below.


    American Baptist Churches USA
    http://www.abc-usa.org/

    Catholic Charities
    http://www.catholiccharitiesusa.org/

    Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) Week of Compassion
    http://www.weekofcompassion.org/

    Christian Reformed World Relief Committee
    http://www.crwrc.org/

    Church of the Brethren
    http://www.brethren.org/genbd/ersm/index.htm

    Cooperative Baptist Fellowship
    http://www.thefellowship.info/Landing/relief.icm

    Episcopal Relief and Development
    http://www.er-d.org/

    Lutheran Disaster Response
    http://www.elca.org/dcs/disaster/

    Mennonite Disaster Service
    http://www.mds.mennonite.net/

    Presbyterian Disaster Assistance
    http://www.pcusa.org/pda/

    Reformed Church in America
    http://rcws.rca.org/

    Salvation Army
    http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/

    Southern Baptist Convention
    http://www.namb.net/site/c.9qKILUOzE...f_Homepage.htm

    United Church of Christ
    http://www.ucc.org/oghs/national.htm

    United Methodist Committee on Relief
    http://gbgm-umc.org/umcor/emergency/youhelp.stm


    Those interested in volunteering should not head south to help in disaster areas without receiving formal direction from their local emergency management agencies. Those who travel without first receiving direction may be turned away by relief efforts in the affected areas.

    "We would like to thank the thousands of Kentuckians who are signing up to volunteer in the wake of this devastating hurricane," said General Maxwell Clay Bailey, director of the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management. "But we also want to ensure these efforts take place in the areas that need the greatest amount of help."

    "As requests come in, private agencies play a major role in the recovery effort and provide much needed support," said Steve Oglesby, Kentucky Emergency Management's Area 14 manager. "However, these agencies have limited resources and often depend on donations from the public to fund their programs. Past experience has shown us the public can actually be generous to a fault by providing items that are not immediately needed or require special needs. The best and most productive donation can be made in the form of cash."

    Individuals wanting to make donations are strongly encouraged to consider doing so with MONETARY contributions to one of the groups named above or another reputable relief and recovery organization.

    ----
    There's more to the press release but the rest is just local contact information.
    Just switched from PPC6700 to AT&T Tilt.

  6. #6
    Editor and Site Administrator Convergent's Avatar
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    Thanks Mannie...

    Each day this sinks in a bit more. Somehow hearing that 20K refugees are being moved from one state to another is something you don't expect to hear of in the US. That really hit me yesterday.

    These people are in our prayers.
    Mike - Been Converged?

  7. #7
    MEG
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    Heard the CT Red Cross advertising for volunteers to go to the region and help. That type of request, all the way up here in CT surprised me. I think this will be bigger than anyone grasps right now. Gas was $3.41 at the station this morning.

    Mark

  8. #8
    Fisher of Men mwfielder's Avatar
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    Can you even imagine if your city was completely wiped out?!? Now take a city the size of New Orleans, and consider the water damage, disease, filth, total destruction of utilities, broken levies, etc... All those displaced people.

    This is bigger than 9/11. It really is hard to grasp the enormity (sp?) of it all.
    Jeremiah 29:11

  9. #9
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    food for thought...

    Clinton Advisor

    "No One Can Say they Didn't See it Coming"

    By Sidney Blumenthal
    In 2001, FEMA warned that a hurricane striking New Orleans was one of the three most likely disasters in the U.S. But the Bush administration cut New Orleans flood control funding by 44 percent to pay for the Iraq war.
    Biblical in its uncontrolled rage and scope, Hurricane Katrina has left millions of Americans to scavenge for food and shelter and hundreds to thousands reportedly dead. With its main levee broken, the evacuated city of New Orleans has become part of the Gulf of Mexico. But the damage wrought by the hurricane may not entirely be the result of an act of nature.

    A year ago the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers proposed to study how New Orleans could be protected from a catastrophic hurricane, but the Bush administration ordered that the research not be undertaken. After a flood killed six people in 1995, Congress created the Southeast Louisiana Urban Flood Control Project, in which the Corps of Engineers strengthened and renovated levees and pumping stations. In early 2001, the Federal Emergency Management Agency issued a report stating that a hurricane striking New Orleans was one of the three most likely disasters in the U.S., including a terrorist attack on New York City. But by 2003 the federal funding for the flood control project essentially dried up as it was drained into the Iraq war. In 2004, the Bush administration cut funding requested by the New Orleans district of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for holding back the waters of Lake Pontchartrain by more than 80 percent. Additional cuts at the beginning of this year (for a total reduction in funding of 44.2 percent since 2001) forced the New Orleans district of the Corps to impose a hiring freeze. The Senate had debated adding funds for fixing New Orleans' levees, but it was too late.

    The New Orleans Times-Picayune, which before the hurricane published a series on the federal funding problem, and whose presses are now underwater, reported online: "No one can say they didn't see it coming ... Now in the wake of one of the worst storms ever, serious questions are being asked about the lack of preparation."

    The Bush administration's policy of turning over wetlands to developers almost certainly also contributed to the heightened level of the storm surge. In 1990, a federal task force began restoring lost wetlands surrounding New Orleans. Every two miles of wetland between the Crescent City and the Gulf reduces a surge by half a foot. Bush had promised "no net loss" of wetlands, a policy launched by his father's administration and bolstered by President Clinton. But he reversed his approach in 2003, unleashing the developers. The Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency then announced they could no longer protect wetlands unless they were somehow related to interstate commerce.

    In response to this potential crisis, four leading environmental groups conducted a joint expert study, concluding in 2004 that without wetlands protection New Orleans could be devastated by an ordinary, much less a Category 4 or 5, hurricane. "There's no way to describe how mindless a policy that is when it comes to wetlands protection," said one of the report's authors. The chairman of the White House's Council on Environmental Quality dismissed the study as "highly questionable," and boasted, "Everybody loves what we're doing."

    NEWSLETTER <http://www.spiegel.de/international/...361702,00.html>" src="http://www.spiegel.de/static/sys/v6/doppelpfeil_re_000_17x7.gif" width=17 border=0 <http://www.spiegel.de/international/...361702,00.html> Sign up for Spiegel Online's daily newsletter and get the best of Der Spiegel's and Spiegel Online's international coverage in your In-Box everyday. <http://service.spiegel.de/backoffice...nlen&locale=en>
    <http://service.spiegel.de/backoffice...nlen&locale=en> <http://service.spiegel.de/backoffice...nlen&locale=en>
    "My administration's climate change policy will be science based," President Bush declared in June 2001. But in 2002, when the Environmental Protection Agency submitted a study on global warming to the United Nations reflecting its expert research, Bush derided it as "a report put out by a bureaucracy," and excised the climate change assessment from the agency's annual report. The next year, when the EPA issued its first comprehensive "Report on the Environment," stating, "Climate change has global consequences for human health and the environment," the White House simply demanded removal of the line and all similar conclusions. At the G-8 meeting in Scotland this year, Bush successfully stymied any common action on global warming. Scientists, meanwhile, have continued to accumulate impressive data on the rising temperature of the oceans, which has produced more severe hurricanes.

    In February 2004, 60 of the nation's leading scientists, including 20 Nobel laureates, warned in a statement, "Restoring Scientific Integrity in Policymaking": "Successful application of science has played a large part in the policies that have made the United States of America the world's most powerful nation and its citizens increasingly prosperous and healthy ... Indeed, this principle has long been adhered to by presidents and administrations of both parties in forming and implementing policies. The administration of George W. Bush has, however, disregarded this principle ... The distortion of scientific knowledge for partisan political ends must cease." Bush completely ignored this statement.

    In the two weeks preceding the storm in the Gulf, the trumping of science by ideology and expertise by special interests accelerated. The Federal Drug Administration announced that it was postponing sale of the morning-after contraceptive pill, despite overwhelming scientific evidence of its safety and its approval by the FDA's scientific advisory board. The United Nations special envoy for HIV/AIDS in Africa accused the Bush administration of responsibility for a condom shortage in Uganda -- the result of the administration's evangelical Christian agenda of "abstinence." When the chief of the Bureau of Justice Statistics in the Justice Department was ordered by the White House to delete its study that African-Americans and other minorities are subject to racial profiling in police traffic stops and he refused to buckle under, he was forced out of his job. When the Army Corps of Engineers' chief contracting oversight analyst objected to a $7 billion no-bid contract awarded for work in Iraq to Halliburton (the firm at which Vice President Cheney was formerly CEO), she was demoted despite her superior professional ratings. At the National Park Service, a former Cheney aide, a political appointee lacking professional background, drew up a plan to overturn past environmental practices and prohibit any mention of evolution while allowing sale of religious materials through the Park Service.

    On the day the levees burst in New Orleans, Bush delivered a speech in Colorado comparing the Iraq war to World War II and himself to Franklin D. Roosevelt: "And he knew that the best way to bring peace and stability to the region was by bringing freedom to Japan." Bush had boarded his very own "Streetcar Named Desire."

    Sidney Blumenthal, a former assistant and senior advisor to President Clinton and the author of "The Clinton Wars," is writing a column for Salon and the Guardian of London.

  10. #10
    Fisher of Men mwfielder's Avatar
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    Hmmm.... I wonder where Mr. Blumenthal's politics lie...

    I think the main problem lies where they decided to put the city in the first place...

    Bad things are going to happen. If its not one thing its another. I'm sure we can do more to prevent earthquake damage in California. Tornado damage in Oklahoma. Heart disease in the elderly. Bush has been focused on terrorism. Why shouldn't he be? They have attacked us on our soil, and will likely do it again. They quickly showed us how imminent a threat they are and will be.

    My heart goes out to the victims in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Maybe some of the damage could have been prevented, but there would still have likely been terrible damage no matter what precautions were done.

    I'll stop my ramble. I just get tired of people like Mr. Blumenthal who choose events like these to throw mud and blame people they don't care for.
    Jeremiah 29:11

  11. #11
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    ill tell you guys one thing.. there is tons of footage that will never make air that is just unbelievable...

  12. #12
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    Originally posted by mwfielder
    Hmmm.... I wonder where Mr. Blumenthal's politics lie...

    I think the main problem lies where they decided to put the city in the first place...

    Bad things are going to happen. If its not one thing its another. I'm sure we can do more to prevent earthquake damage in California. Tornado damage in Oklahoma. Heart disease in the elderly. Bush has been focused on terrorism. Why shouldn't he be? They have attacked us on our soil, and will likely do it again. They quickly showed us how imminent a threat they are and will be.

    My heart goes out to the victims in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Maybe some of the damage could have been prevented, but there would still have likely been terrible damage no matter what precautions were done.

    I'll stop my ramble. I just get tired of people like Mr. Blumenthal who choose events like these to throw mud and blame people they don't care for.
    Actually, it makes a lot of sense to have a major port city at or near the mouth of the largest river system in North America. So you really can't fault the location, at least not to say that the city shouldn't have been built there.

    I lived in New Orleans during the 80's and I can tell you that this scenario is not new. It was everybody's worst nightmare in the city even back then - and even before that. Any cutbacks in protection or remediation of the problem are therefore fair game for criticism. It's really not adequate to say that "there would still have likely been terrible damage no matter what precautions were done." That's a copout, especially if the policies that were enacted truly enhanced the catastrophe.

    Maybe Blumenthal is making political hay. But maybe he's right. His remarks should be judged on their merits, not his politics. On the flip side, Bush shouldn't be given a free ride on his politics either.
    Last edited by jstpa; 09-01-2005 at 10:59 PM.

  13. #13
    Melchizedek Priest Nephi's Avatar
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    I wanted to point out one more church who is accepting donations to help fund the relief effort. The LDS church has been a strong partner of the red cross since 1986, and is worldwide one of the highest donors during time of need (I only say this to support that they are not some scam). You can find info about their help through the red cross here. If you want to help the relief effort through the LDS church, you may do so here.

    Thanks, and please, no matter how you help, please, give, pray, and hope. Its all we can do from afar.
    Nephi
    "Thy days are known, and thy years shall not be numbered less; therefore, fear not what man can do, for God shall be with you forever and ever." -- D&C 122:9

  14. #14
    Converged Master TBCompDesign's Avatar
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    PPCBootscreens.com - Hurricane Katrina relief effort - Donations to Red Cross

    I'm sure all of you have heard/seen the devistation in New Orleans.

    I want to do anything I can to help. I am donating any donations received at PPCBootscreens.com, to the American Red Cross in the name of PPCBootscreens.com. Please find it in your heart to do what you can to help these people in their time of need.

    You can use the Donate button on the ppcbootscreens.com homepage to help.
    TB CompDesign
    Cingular 8125 and lovin' it

  15. #15
    Fisher of Men mwfielder's Avatar
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    Originally posted by jstpa
    Actually, it makes a lot of sense to have a major port city at or near the mouth of the largest river system in North America. So you really can't fault the location, at least not to say that the city shouldn't have been built there.

    I lived in New Orleans during the 80's and I can tell you that this scenario is not new. It was everybody's worst nightmare in the city even back then - and even before that. Any cutbacks in protection or remediation of the problem are therefore fair game for criticism. It's really not adequate to say that "there would still have likely been terrible damage no matter what precautions were done." That's a copout, especially if the policies that were enacted truly enhanced the catastrophe.

    Maybe Blumenthal is making political hay. But maybe he's right. His remarks should be judged on their merits, not his politics. On the flip side, Bush shouldn't be given a free ride on his politics either.
    Fair comments. I still think there would have been devastating damage, but maybe there could have been reduction in the flooding.

    Maybe we can relocate the city back about 100 miles?
    Jeremiah 29:11

  16. #16
    Old School mjorange's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Marctronixx
    ill tell you guys one thing.. there is tons of footage that will never make air that is just unbelievable...
    I know that must be true. I have family and friends in the area who have lost EVERYTHING.

    I sent you an email Marc.

    Read a bit more about what a growing multi-cultural population is shouting at my blog.

  17. #17
    I'm a total loser and I've been banned!!!
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    A 44% reduction in flood preparedness funding, when it is acknowledged by our federal government that a catastrophic flood of New Orleans constitutes 1 of the highest 3 national emergency concerns is beyond party politics. That action constitutes a catastrophic lack of humanity and responsibility.

  18. #18
    Mysterious Penguin sloppychachi's Avatar
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    I think it is inappropriate to enter politics into this thread no matter how well disguised they are.

    People make comments about funding and preparation however they do not talk about the factors involved in the decision making processes that govern those activities.

    When you drive on the new highway that saves you 20 minutes, when your town receives that grant for new school buses, when you receive any one of the myriad of federal and state handouts, do you reject those items?

    I am sure that everyone makes note to complain "Stop giving me this stuff and provide flood funding in Louisiana."

    This is a terrible situation that has resulted in loss of life and devastation for many. It is easy to Monday morning quarterback. If you want to spend time making comments, I suggest that you make them count... speaking to a higher power, asking for protection and guidance.
    Here..maybe... do you smell something fishy?

  19. #19
    MEG
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    I agree that it is inappropriate to bicker about blame when there is so much work to be done. I personally know of people in CT taking in New Orleans displaced family. That's a long way to go for shelter. However, there will come a time when the conscience decisions of a few people will be called into question. The choices they made affected millions and in hindsight, may have been reckless. Mistakes have been made, we must understand them, to learn not to repeat them.
    Mark

  20. #20
    I'm a total loser and I've been banned!!!
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    Say what you will. It doesn't change the truth. Those who determined that proper funding for New Orleans' flood preparedness was our National #2 disaster threat weren't taking politics into account. Quite a difference between your comparison of funding priorities and the reality of New Orleans. The people of New Orleans would agree.

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